Areas and Subjects

click on the area to view the subjects:

Areas 1 – Infant feeding and the global agenda


Infant feeding as part of the global agenda is an appropriate area for discussion of the current social, economic, environmental and political international context. It covers supranational political and strategic issues that have a bearing on the promotion, protection and support of breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding.

Area 2 -Infant feeding in the contemporary context


Discussions and studies based on an analysis and knowledge of practices in breastfeeding and complementary feeding in different socio-cultural settings, populations and family settings should be included in this area. This also includes new frontiers, discoveries and breakthroughs of multiple fields of applied social sciences, as well as awareness of their knowledge gaps.

Area 3 - Ethics, rights and equity in infant feeding issues


In this area we seek to gather reflections on breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding as universal human rights to be protected for life. This includes issues that undermine the guarantee of these rights, seen from an ethical perspective, leaving ethnic and other groups and cultures vulnerable to both food insecurity and marketing pressures of food industries and the global market.

Area 4 - Policies and practices to promote, protect and support breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding


This area includes public policies, initiatives and strategic activities of governments, public health agencies and related areas, clinical practice, community agents and non-governmental organizations to promote, protect and support breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding.

Area 5 – Training and education in breastfeeding and complementary feeding


One purpose of this area is to gather general studies and articles on different aspects of health education and training for breastfeeding and complementary feeding, including school and university curricula, as well as actual and virtual training courses for professionals and families. Another purpose is to discuss how other disciplines and approaches have contributed to the establishment of cultures and customs that encourage breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding.
Areas 1 – Infant feeding and the global agenda
Subjects:
• Global strategies, actions, funding and approaches to the promotion, protection and support of breastfeeding, healthy complementary feeding and in the fight against malnutrition and obesity;
• The World Breastfeeding Week as a tool for social mobilization in favour of breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding;
• Breastfeeding / healthy complementary feeding and environmental issues: the impact of artificial feeding on the environment; ultra-processed foods and food packaging; issues related to climate change;
• Commercial agriculture and global trade policies; pressure on traditional food production systems and policies to protect from such pressures;
• The International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes and subsequent World Health Assembly resolutions: implementation, recent changes and monitoring (NetCode);
• Corporate policies and practices that impact breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding;
• Conflicts of interest. Impact of transnational corporations on formulating and reviewing global policies for the protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding, the use of ultra-processed products to the detriment of healthy complementary feeding and the fight against malnutrition (SUN (Scaling Up Nutrition Strategy) and WHO- case study);
• Codex Alimentarius and industrial / commercial pressures;
• The World Breastfeeding Trends Initiative (WBTI) and other global indicators; and monitoring of violations of the International Code and subsequent WHA resolutions;
• Breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding on the global agenda in different countries, regions, ethnic groups, religions, parenting systems;
• Sustainable Development Goals, breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding;
• Infant feeding in emergencies and major migrations, refugees;
• Universal declarations and other United Nations decisions on breastfeeding, infant feeding and their implementation (Innocenti Declaration, Global Strategy, ILO Conventions, FAO and food distribution programs, etc.).
Area 2 -Infant feeding in the contemporary context
Subjects:
• Culture and education in breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding; breastfeeding in the globalized context;
• Culinary skills and food culture;
• Breastfeeding and complementary feeding cultures and practices in families with different configurations; non-traditional parenting and breastfeeding and complementary feeding; breastfeeding and sexuality; babies of adolescent parents;
• Food and nutrition security policies and their relationship to breastfeeding and healthy infant feeding;
• Child obesity and malnutrition, obesogenic environments, food insecurity and inadequate infant feeding;
• Status and trends of breastfeeding and complementary feeding;
• Marketing practices that compete with breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding;
• New communication technologies (apps, games, social media, etc.) in breastfeeding and complementary feeding;
• Innovative strategies, including communication, to strengthen enforcement of the International Code and WHA resolutions, as well as national standards, such as the NBCAL;
• The influence of social networks on breastfeeding and complementary feeding;
• Multiple and interdisciplinary approaches to breastfeeding and complementary feeding;
• Epidemic of caesarean sections and obstetric violence - relationship with the practice of breastfeeding;
• Critical mapping of scientific gaps in breastfeeding and complementary feeding;
• New frontiers of discoveries about breast milk: microbiomes, oligosaccharides and epigenetics
Area 3 - Ethics, rights and equity in infant feeding issues
Sujects:
• The human right to breastfeeding and to adequate and healthy food;
• The relationship of breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding with food sovereignty and nutritional security;
• Ethics and conflicts of interest;
• Development models inequity;
• Globalization and inequity;
• Social, gender and ethnic inequalities in breastfeeding and complementary feeding;
• Protection of peoples' right to their food culture;
• Breastfeeding in situations of vulnerability (e.g. women who are deprived of their freedom, who live on the streets, or are subject to violence);
• Breastfeeding for women with special needs;
• Student mothers who breastfeed;
• Protection of a mother’s right to accompany her child when it is hospitalized;
• Gender and food; feminism and breastfeeding; empowerment, autonomy and emancipation;
• Women's work, maternity leave, other legal protection measures and imaginative ways to protect breastfeeding.
Area 4 - Policies and practices to promote, protect and support breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding
Subjects:
4.1 - Policies to promote, protect and support breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding
• Analysis of advances, challenges and shortcomings of public policies for the promotion, protection and support of breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding, in the legal, health, education, social and other areas;
• Cost-effectiveness analyses of policies for the promotion, protection and support for breastfeeding and healthy complementary nutrition;
• Analysis of income transfer policies (Bolsa Família Program, etc.) and repercussions on infant feeding;
• Studies and actions to promote favourable environments for the promotion of healthy eating and the prevention of childhood obesity, such as: nutrition labeling, advertising regulation, taxing of ultra-processed foods, as well as actions in organizational settings such as school canteens, kindergartens, schools and women's workplaces;
• Labor legislation and policies to protect maternity and paternity through the extension of maternity leave, paternity leave, policies for the creation of nursing rooms; policies to protect pregnant and nursing students; policies to protect informal working mothers;
• Monitoring, evaluation and strengthening of the International Code and national standards, such as NBCAL;
• Regulatory measures with a bearing on breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding;
• Policies and / or actions to promote and support breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding for women deprived of their freedom;
• Promotion, protection and support to breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding in primary health care;
• Analysis and experience with food guides for young children in different contexts;
• Humanization of delivery and childbirth;
• Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative - BFHI: experiences, advances, challenges, gaps and outlook;
• Human milk banks: experiences, challenges and future;
• Kangaroo method: experiences, challenges and outlook;
• Breastfeeding and complementary feeding and links to health policies for men and women;
• World Breastfeeding Week;
• Other policies to promote breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding.

4.2 - Breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding in practice

• Counselling on breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding;
• Clinical practices in breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding;
• Phono-odontological approach to the clinical management of lactation and complementary feeding;
• Iatrogenic behaviour in the clinical management of lactation;
• Feeding and child development;
• Breastfeeding and complementary feeding in situations of vulnerability (preterm new born, breastfeeding in emergencies);
• Breastfeeding and complementary feeding in special situations (obesity, malnutrition, infectious diseases and arboviroses(HIV, HTLV, Zika);
• Breastfeeding and humanized birth and birth care practices;
• The mother’s mental health during breastfeeding (postpartum depression; woman satisfaction with breastfeeding, mother-child bonding);
• Breastfeeding and medicines;
• Breastfeeding for women with special needs;
• Controversies in breastfeeding: laser therapy, ankyloglossia, cavities, mammoplasty, cross-breastfeeding, use of accessories - pumps, food supplement, silicone nipples, shells, "prolonged" breastfeeding, maternal diet and allergy in children etc.;
• Controversies in complementary feeding: moment of introduction of complementary foods, use of ultra-processed foods, etc.;
• Consultants in breastfeeding: standardization, regulation: international experience, national challenges;
• Mother-to-mother support, groups of mothers, virtual support for infant feeding;
• Civil society groups and community support networks;
• Culinary skills; cooking autonomy; the potential of cooking in the promotion of healthy complementary feeding;
• Complementary feeding and household food environment; parenting practices;
• Other activities to promote breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding.

Area 5 – Training and education in breastfeeding and complementary feeding
Subjects:
• Breastfeeding and complementary feeding in professional education and undergraduate curricula;
• Training for breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding habits on the job;
• Contribution of different disciplines towards professional training for breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding;
• Ongoing education: staff management for the qualification of professionals and of health services;
• Training and culture in breastfeeding and complementary feeding;
• Teaching about infant feeding in children and adolescents’ curricula; the culture of breastfeeding in kindergartens and pre-schools; breastfeeding in primary education; primary education as a means to promote, protect and support breastfeeding, adequate and healthy feeding;
• Art, culture and languages in training and education for breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding;
• Training and education for breastfeeding and complementary feeding through different media;
• Child feeding throughout the ages;
• Food as an expression of family and regional culture; children and creating culture and eating habits;
• Infant nutrition in didactic and literary materials;
• Inclusive training and education for breastfeeding and complementary feeding for groups with reduced functionalities;
• Breastfeeding, complementary feeding and popular education: chats, cultural groups, dialogues, formation of community groups, among others;
• Methodological approaches to the teaching of breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding as part of vocational training; distance teaching; active methodologies, telehealth and other teaching platforms;
• Advocacy training for healthy infant feeding.



REGISTRATION

 



 

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SCIENTIFIC

ABSTRACTS



 

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THOUSAND MOTHERS

BREASTFEEDING



 

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Note the
main dates


30

Aug

2019

Third deadline for registrations at a discount value!
Don't miss it!



Event Venues

PRE MEETING

UERJ - Maracanã Campus

The State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ) is one the leading universities in Brazil and Latin America. It has campi in 7 cities in the Rio de Janeiro State. The Maracanã campus being the biggest.

São Francisco Xavier St., 524 - Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20550-900

THE MEETING

SulAmérica Convention Center

Inaugurated in July 2007, the SulAmérica Convention Center was designed with the objective of being a multipurpose space and aimed at meeting the demands of various sectors for the accomplishment of its events.
Central location, infrastructure and state-of-the-art technology are the hallmarks of the SulAmérica Convention Center, which is fully equipped to host national and international lectures, workshops, congresses, conventions and fairs.

Av. Paulo de Frontin, 1 - Cidade Nova, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20260-010

A THOUSAND MOTHERS BREASTFEEDING

MAM Gardens

The Museum of Modern Art of Rio de Janeiro is one of the most important cultural institutions in Brasil. It is located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, at the Parque do Flamengo, near the Santos Dumont airport.

Av. Infante Dom Henrique, 85 - Parque do Flamengo, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20021-140